George D. Schwab (born November 25, 1931) is an American political scientist, editor and academic. He was the president of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, an American non-partisan foreign policy think tank. He co-founded the organization in 1974 and served as its president from 1993 to 2015, and was the editor of its bimonthly journal, American Foreign Policy Interests

Schwab was born in Latvia on November 25, 1931, to Arkady Schwab and Klara Schwab (née Jacobson) of Latvian Jewish ancestry. The family later immigrated to the United States.

 

Career

Schwab began his teaching career at Columbia in New York City in 1959. From 1960 to 1968, he was at The City College of New York and the Graduate Center, CUNY. From 1968 to 1972 he was an assistant Professor of history, an associate professor from 1973 to 1979, and professor from 1980 to 2000, and professor emeritus (City College and the Graduate Center), 2001–present

In 1974, Schwab was a co-founder of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy with the late Hans J. Morgenthau. He has edited the committee’s bimonthly, American Foreign Policy Interests, since the inception of its publication in 1976. In 1984 he contributed a chapter titled A Decade of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy to a Festschrift in honor of Hans J. Morgenthau and the National Committee. Before assuming the presidency of the Committee in 1993, he was its senior vice president and vice president.

Schwab has also lectured widely on his concept of The Open-Society Bloc at, among other institutions, the University of Freiburg in Germany and the Bundeswehrhochschule at Hamburg. He has also presented papers and actively participated at international gatherings in Tokyo; Paris (the Nobel Laureate conference at the Elysée Palace, 1988); Jerusalem; Washington, D.C.; and New York.

In the fall of 2001 the National Committee received a private endowment designed to honor the work of Professor Schwab which led to the creation of the George D. Schwab Foreign Policy Briefings. Speakers at the briefings range from heads of state, foreign ministers, ambassadors, officials of international organizations, and other foreign policy practitioners and experts. They are held throughout the year to give members and guests the opportunity to extend and enhance their understanding of issues that affect the national interests of the United States.

Schwab retired from teaching in 2000; he is currently professor emeritus of City College and the Graduate Center. He retired from the National Committee in 2016 and now holds the title of president emeritus.

 

Memberships

  • Council on Foreign Relations
  • German Studies Association
  • The City University of New York Academy of Humanities and Sciences
  • Columbia University’s Seminar on the History of Legal and Political Thought and Institutions.
  • United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.: Committee on Conscience, Academic Committee, Collections and Acquisitions Committee
  • Latvian President’s Commission of International Historians
  • Vice President of the Telos-Paul Piccone Institute

Schwab was born in Latvia on November 25, 1931, to Arkady Schwab and Klara Schwab (née Jacobson) of Latvian Jewish ancestry. The family later immigrated to the United States.

 

Awards

  • Decorated Order of the Three Stars (Latvia) (2002)
  • Ellis Island Medal of Honor (May 1998)
  • Elie Wiesel Award (2018) awarded by United States Holocaust Memorial Museum